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Tree and Canopy Height Estimation with Scanning Lidar

  • Benoît St-Onge
  • Paul Treitz
  • Michael A. Wulder

Abstract

A large part of the research efforts concerning the remote sensing of forests has been devoted to the development of repeatable methods for the extraction of information from monoscopic, two-dimensional images. Emphasis has been on spectral pattern recognition. Although appropriate for species or health characterisation, this approach comes with several limitations when detailed information on forest structure, e.g. three-dimensional aspects of forest canopies, is sought (Wulder 1998). Accurate measurements of height, density, volume, stratification, etc. at local scales, which are of prime interest for foresters and forest ecologists, and which have a geometric rather than radiometric nature, are still beyond the capabilities of two-dimensional remote sensing and image processing.

Keywords

Global Position System Canopy Height Lidar Data Inertial Navigation System Stand Height 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benoît St-Onge
    • 1
  • Paul Treitz
    • 2
  • Michael A. Wulder
    • 3
  1. 1.Université du Québec à MontréalMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Queen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  3. 3.Canadian Forest Service (Pacific Forestry Centre)Natural Resources CanadaVictoriaCanada

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