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Global Industrial Policies

  • Wolfram Elsner
Chapter

Abstract

The characteristics of the “new” economy are to be seen not so much in the hypermanias of the high-tech stock markets that have turned out, with their recent depressions, to be rather conventional. They have to be seen as knowledge-based, clustered, and networked economies. They manifest considerable intensification of direct interdependencies among economic agents, where the outcome of A directly depends also on the behavior of B, and vice versa. This has always been true of modern economies, as institutionalists and socio-economists have routinely contended. But it has become so intense, obvious, and ubiquitous that it can by no means be ignored any longer in either standard theory or policy formation.

Keywords

Political Economy Global Economy Institutional Arrangement Industrial Policy Coordination Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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