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Trends in Pesticide Use Since the Introduction of Genetically Engineered Crops

  • Janet E. Carpenter
  • Leonard P. Gianessi

Abstract

The first wave of genetically engineered crops consists primarily of varieties that offer alternative methods of insect or weed control. Corn and cotton varieties engineered to express an insecticidal protein from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide built-in protection from insect pests. Herbicide tolerant crops allow growers to apply herbicides over a growing crop that would otherwise destroy the crop. The introduction of these new varieties has resulted in dramatic changes in pesticide use.

Keywords

Weed Control Methyl Parathion European Corn Borer Cotton Variety Boll Weevil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet E. Carpenter
    • 1
  • Leonard P. Gianessi
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center for Food and Agricultural PolicyUSA

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