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Temperament pp 71-98 | Cite as

Consistency and Change in Temperament

  • Diana Wright Guerin
  • Allen W. Gottfried
  • Pamella H. Oliver
  • Craig W. Thomas
Part of the Longitudinal Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences book series (LRSB)

Abstract

In this chapter, we address two central issues in the study of development: change and consistency. The longitudinal research methodology is best suited to address the nature of temperament with advancement in age during childhood, as it allows examination of both the consistency of the individual’s rank position compared to others (i.e., stability) as well as change/consistency in the dimensions of temperament across individuals as a function of age (i.e., continuity). As noted in chapter 1, a particularly unique aspect of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study (FLS) is the frequency and continuity of temperament assessments; 10 assessment waves were conducted at designated and regular intervals from infancy (1.5 years) through adolescence (16 years). The temperament measures used during each developmental era and dimensions assessed on each measure are summarized in Table 3.01.

Keywords

Negative Mood Canonical Correlation Analysis Middle Childhood Task Orientation Temperament Dimension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diana Wright Guerin
    • 1
  • Allen W. Gottfried
    • 1
  • Pamella H. Oliver
    • 1
  • Craig W. Thomas
    • 2
  1. 1.California State UniversityFullertonUSA
  2. 2.Claremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA

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