Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector

Comparative Perspectives on Structure and Change
  • Helmut K. Anheier
Part of the Nonprofit and Civil Society Studies book series (NCSS)

Abstract

Cross-nationally, the introduction of New Public Management (NPM) (Barzelay, 2000; Ferlie, 1996; Hood, 1991) seems closely related to the growth of the nonprofit or third sector (see Salamon et al., 1999). The basic thesis of this paper is that the combination of growth and NPM amplified differentiation processes within the nonprofit sector, and that the dynamics of these processes vary across “nonprofit regime types.” Significantly, the growth has largely been an expansion of the economic dimension of nonprofit organizations as service providers, whereas other aspects like membership and volunteering have grown much less and have even stagnated in some instances. What is rarely understood is that the substantial expansion of the third sector may indeed call into question its long-term sustainability in its present form. Indeed, as this paper argues, the sector is becoming qualitatively different, and not only quantitatively larger. This paper wants to explore this thesis from a conceptual as well as methodological point of view by trying to “map” changes in the facets of the third sector in a cross-section of countries and over time to capture aspects of this quantitative-qualitative jump in nonprofit sector development.

Keywords

Migration Europe Recombination Income OECD 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aldrich, H. (1999). Organizations evolving. Thousand Oaks and London: Sage.Google Scholar
  2. Anheier, H. K., & Salamon L. M. (1998). Nonprofit institutions and the household sector. InGoogle Scholar
  3. United Nations Statistics Division (ed.), The household sector. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
  4. Anheier, H. K., & Seibel, W. (Eds.), (1990). The third sector: Comparative studies of nonprofit organizations. Berlin and New York: DeGruyter.Google Scholar
  5. Anheier, H. K., & Seibel, W. (2001). The nonprofit sector in Germany. In L. M. Salamon & Helmut K. Anheier (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Anheier, H. K., & Kendall, J. (Eds.), (2001). The nonprofit sector at the crossroad: A comparative policy analysis. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Anheier, H. K., & Ben-Ner, A. (1997). The shifting boundaries: Long-terms changes in the size of the forprofit, nonprofit, cooperative and government sectors. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, 68(3), 335–354.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Archambault, E. (1996). The nonprofit sector in France. In L. M. Salamon & H. K. Anheier (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Barbetta, G. P. (1997). The nonprofit sector in Italy. L. M. Salamon & H. K. Anheier (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Barzelay, M. (2000). How to argue about the new public management. International Public Management Journal, 2(2), 183–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ben-Ner, A., & Van Hommissen, T. (1993). Nonprofit organizations in the mixed economy: A demand and supply analysis. In A. Ben-Ner and B. Gui (Eds.), The nonprofit sector in the mixed economy. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  12. Ben-Ner, A., & Gui, B (Eds.), (1993). The nonprofit sector in the mixed economy. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  13. Billis, D. (1989). A theory of the voluntary sector: Implications for policy and practice. Working paper 5, Centre for Voluntary Organisations, London School of Economics.Google Scholar
  14. Calhoun, C. (1997). The public good as a social and cultural product. In W. W. Powell & E. Clemens (Eds.), Private action and the public good (pp. 20–35). New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Partha D., & Serageldin, I. (Eds.), (2000). Social capital: A multifaceted approach. Washington, DC: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  16. DiMaggio, P, & Anheier, H. K. (1990). A sociological conceptualization of non-profit organizations and sectors. Annual Review of Sociology, 16, 137–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Esping-Andersen, G. (1990). The three worlds of welfare capitalism. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Ferlie, E. (Ed.), (1996). The new public management in action. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Fukuyama, F. (1996). Trust: The social virtues and the creation of prosperity. New York: The Free Press.Google Scholar
  20. Hansmann, H. (1980). The role of non-profit enterprise. Yale Law Journal, 89(5), 835–901.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hansmann, H. (1987). Economic Theories of Nonprofit Organizations. In W. W. Powell (Ed.), The nonprofit sector: A research handbook (pp. 27–42). New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Hansmann, H. (1996). The ownership of enterprise. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Hood, C. (1991). A new public management for all seasons? Public Administration, 69(1), 3–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Huber, E., Ragin, Charles., & Stephens John D. (1993). Social Democracy, Christian  Democracy, Constitutional Structures, and the Welfare State. American journal of Sociology, 99(3), 711–749.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Inglehart, R. (1990). Culture shift in advanced industrial society. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Inglehart, R. (1997). Modernization and postmodernization. Cultural, economic and political chance on 43 societies. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Inglehart, R. (1998). Human values and beliefs: A cross-cultural sourcebook. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  28. Kendall, J., & Knapp, M. (1997). The nonprofit sector in the United Kingdom. In L. M. Salamon & H. K. Anheier (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Kuti, E. (1996). The nonprofit sector in Hungary. In L. M. Salamon & H. K. Anheier (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Putnam, R. (1993). Making democracy work: Civic traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Romanelli, E. (1991). The evolution of new organizational forms. Annual Review of Sociology, 17, 79–103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Salamon, L. M. (1995). Partners in public service: Government—nonprofit relations in the modern welfare state. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier H. K. (1996a). The emerging nonprofit sector. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier, H. K. (Eds.), (1997). Defining the nonprofit sector: A cross-national analysis. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier, H. K. (1992a.) In search of the nonprofit sector I: The question of definitions. Voluntas, 3(2), 125–151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier, H. K. (1992b). In search of the nonprofit sector II: The problem of classification. Voluntas, 3(3), 267–309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier, H. K. (1996b). The international classification of nonprofit organizations-revision 1. Working Papers of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, No. 19. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies.Google Scholar
  38. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier, H. K. (1998). The social origins of civil society: Explaining the nonprofit sector cross-nationally. Voluntas, 9(3), 213–247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Salamon, L. M., Anheier, H. K., List, R., Toepler, S., Wojciech, S., & Associates. (1999). Global civil society. Papers of the Johns Hopkins comparative nonprofit sector project. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies.Google Scholar
  40. Seibel, W. (1990). Government/third sector relationships in a comparative perspective: The cases of France and West Germany. Voluntas, 1, 42–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Till, J. van. (1978). Mapping the third sector. New York: Foundation Center.Google Scholar
  42. United Nations. (1993). System of national accounts. New York: United Nations,Google Scholar
  43. van Deth, J. W. et al. (eds.), (1999). Social capital in Europe. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  44. Voluntas. (1997). Economic theory. Special issue, edited by H. K. Anheier, Vol. 8(2). Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Lundstrom, T., & Wijkstroem, F. (1998). The nonprofit sector in Sweden. In Lester M. Salamon & Helmut K. Anheier. (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  46. World Values Study Group. (1994). World values survey, 1981–1984 and 19901993 [Computer File] ICPSR Version. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research.Google Scholar
  47. Yamamoto, T. (Ed.) (1998). The nonprofit sector in Japan. In Lester M. Salamon & Helmut K. Anheier. (Eds.), The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Series. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut K. Anheier
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.London School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK

Personalised recommendations