On Bipolar Cells: Following in the Footsteps of Phototransduction

  • Malcolm M. Slaughter
  • Gautam B. Awatramani
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 514)

Abstract

The electrical signals resulting from phototransduction are decomposed by bipolar cells and then encoded into spike trains by ganglion cells. The signal decomposition by bipolar cells includes formation of ON and OFF pathways and separation of tonic and phasic signals. The decomposition is accomplished by post-synaptic receptors in the ON and OFF bipolar cells. This chapter focuses on these phenomena in ON bipolar cells and the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in these processes.

Keywords

Permeability Cadmium Retina Neurol EGTA 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm M. Slaughter
    • 1
  • Gautam B. Awatramani
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity at BuffaloSalt Lake CityUSA

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