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Nonadiabatic Transitions and Chemical Dynamics

  • Hiroki Nakamura

Abstract

Nonadiabatic transition plays crucial roles in various branches of sciences as one of the most fundamental mechanisms of state and phase changes. The most typical one is the transition induced by potential curve crossing, which plays an essential role in almost all kinds of chemical dynamics. Recently, we have successfully obtained the complete analytical solutions for the basic Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg type curve crossing problems and demonstrated the usefulness in various dynamic processes. The whole set of solutions is called Zhu-Nakamura theory. All the achievements have recently been summarized as a book [1]. In this review I will touch upon the following applications of the theory together with its brief explanation. The first is the application to the three-dimensional electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions in the DH 2 + system within the framework of the trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method [2,3], The second is a new type of molecular switching with use of the complete reflection phenomenon [4, 5, 6], and the third is laser control of molecular processes [7, 8, 9, 10]. Because of the shortage of space, detailed explanations and equations are skipped and the reader should refer to the original references.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroki Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Theoretical Studies, Institute for Molecular Science, and Department of Functional Molecular ScienceThe Graduate University for Advanced StudiesMyodaiji, OkazakiJapan

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