Proteins and Macromolecular X-ray Analysis

  • Mark Ladd
  • Rex Palmer
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we take a more detailed look at methods of x-ray analysis that are particularly applicable to large biological molecules. It will involve some useful reiteration of concepts and ideas discussed in previous chapters. We would also like to remind readers that although there are definite distinctions between large and small molecules in the crystallographic arena, there is no reason to exclude one from the other, and in fact, there are many advantages in being familiar with both. The major differences should become clearer as you progress through this chapter. It follows that while we mainly deal here with macromolecules, much of the information provided in this chapter is applicable to all areas of crystal structure analysis.

Keywords

Sugar Glycerol Convection Mercury Platinum 

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Bibliography

  1. Branden, C., and Tooze, J. Introduction to Protein Structure, 2nd ed., Garland, New York (1999).Google Scholar
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  3. Drenth, J., Principles of Protein X-Ray Crystallography, 2nd ed.. Springer, New York, Berlin (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. McPherson, A., Preparation and Analysis of Protein Crystals, Krieger Publishing, Melbourne, FL (1989).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Ladd
    • 1
  • Rex Palmer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of SurreyGuildfordEngland
  2. 2.Department of CrystallographyBirkbeck College, University of LondonLondonEngland

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