Contemporary Employment in Psychology and Future Trends

  • Kathleen Barker
  • Jessica Kohout

Abstract

How are new psychology doctorates faring when seeking their first professional position? What are the criteria by which applicants are judged? Is there any point to trying to get a job in academe? Are practice jobs easier to come by? What about consulting? In this chapter, we will use a number of data sources to answer questions like these regarding employment in psychology. Using data from the biennial APA Doctorate Employment Surveys, as well as data from the National Science Foundation and the National Survey of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF) conducted by the U.S. Department of Education, we will sketch a picture of the current employment situation for doctoral-level psychologists in the United States. Data will be presented on employment settings, salaries, perceptions of the marketplace, time to employment and any changes in these over time.

Keywords

Income Assure Schiff Lost Preconceive 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Barker
    • 1
  • Jessica Kohout
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMedgar Evers College of The City University of New YorkBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.Research OfficeAmerican Psychological AssociationUSA

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