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Finbalt Health Monitor

Monitoring Health Behaviour in Finland and the Baltic Countries
  • Ritva Prättälä
  • Ville Helasoja
  • Finbalt Group
  • Anu Kasmel
  • Jurate Klumbiene
  • Iveta Pudule

Abstract

Finland and the Baltic countries are geographically close (Figure 1) and have many cultural ties. However, the countries are going through different stages of economic and social development. Thus, the Baltic Sea region provides a unique opportunity for the study of any phenomena related to social changes. Public health situations in Estonia, Finland, Latvia, and Lithuania are very different. Life expectancy at birth is 5 to 10 years higher in Finland than in the Baltic countries. During the last decades life expectancy in Finland has increased relatively steadily, while in the Baltic countries the development has been less favorable (Zvidrins and Krumins, 1993; Puska et al., 1995). The latest statistics, however, show an increase in life expectancy also in the Baltic countries (Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee, 1998; World Health Organization [WHO] Regional Office for Europe, 2001a).

Keywords

Alcohol Consumption Health Behaviour Food Habit Baltic Country Project Meeting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ritva Prättälä
    • 1
  • Ville Helasoja
    • 1
  • Finbalt Group
  • Anu Kasmel
    • 2
  • Jurate Klumbiene
    • 3
  • Iveta Pudule
    • 4
  1. 1.National Public Health InstituteHelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Estonian Centre for Health PromotionTallinnEstonia
  3. 3.Kaunas University of MedicineKaunasLithuania
  4. 4.Health Promotion CentreRigaLatvia

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