Shipwreck Trails: Public Ownership of a Unique Resource?

An Australian perspective
  • Tim Smith
Part of the The Plenum Series in Underwater Archaeology book series (SSUA)

Abstract

The last major review of the Australian Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Program (CHSP) was undertaken in 1985 (Kenderdine, 1985). A major focus of that plan was the targeting of ways of further promoting Australia’s shipwreck heritage to the public. Since that time, little appears to have been achieved at a national level, while each component state-based maritime archaeology program continues with its own program of site assessment, protection, and, when time and money permits, promotion of local heritage sites.

Keywords

Marketing Beach Excavation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Banks, L., 1999a, Convict Trail Project: Draft Business Plan 2000–2003, Sydney. Banks, L., 1999b, Road Works in Progress, Convict Trail Project Update (newsletter), Number 7.Google Scholar
  2. Budde, P., 1997, Convict Trail Great North Road: Annual Report 1997, Erina.Google Scholar
  3. Heritage Office, 1999, Wrecks Alive: Community Shipwreck Survey Kit, Sydney.Google Scholar
  4. Heritage Office, 1998, Shipwreck Trails: Guidelines, Sydney.Google Scholar
  5. Heritage Office, 1996, Shipwreck Atlas of New South Wales, ed. 3, Sydney.Google Scholar
  6. Heritage Office, 1995, Underwater Heritage: Local Government Guidelines, Sydney.Google Scholar
  7. Heritage Office, 1995, NSW Heritage: Guidelines for Heritage Trails, Sydney.Google Scholar
  8. Heritage Victoria, 1994, The Discovery Coast historic shipwreck trail guide (brochure), Melbourne.Google Scholar
  9. Jeffery, B., 1990, Realising the cultural tourism potential of South Australian shipwrecks, in: Historic Environment 7(3):72–76.Google Scholar
  10. Kenderdine, S., 1995, Historic Shipwrecks National Research Plan, Department of Communications and the Arts, Canberra.Google Scholar
  11. McCarthy, M., 1983, Wrecks and recreation, in: Proceedings of the Second Southern Hemisphere Conference on Maritime Archaeology, South Australian Department of Environment and Planning, Adelaide, pp. 381–390.Google Scholar
  12. McCarthy, M., and Garratt, D., 1998, The WA Maritime Museum’s wreck access and outreach program, in: Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 22:127–132.Google Scholar
  13. Nutley, D., 1998, Ten years of shipwreck access and management practices in New South Wales, in: Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 22:115–118.Google Scholar
  14. Penrose, J., 1983, Education in maritime archaeology: an Australian perspective, in: Proceedings of the Second Southern Hemisphere Conference on Maritime Archaeology, South Australian Department of Environment and Planning, Adelaide, pp. 65–77.Google Scholar
  15. Prince, B., 1997, The evaluation of the Rottnest Island trail experiment, in: Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology 11(1):5–6.Google Scholar
  16. Punchard, E., 1992, Wreck trail identity plinths, a proposed new design for the Hamlin Bay Wreck Trail requiring minimal resource, unpublished paper, Western Australian Maritime Museum.Google Scholar
  17. Robertson, E., 1990, History, heritage and interpretation: historic Quarantine Station, Manly, Sydney, in: Locality, Bulletin of the Community History Program 4(4):7–9.Google Scholar
  18. Samuel, B., 1999, Interpreting heritage, in: Heritage South Australia 14:11–ff.Google Scholar
  19. Strachan, S., 1995, Interpreting maritime heritage: Australian historic shipwreck trails, in: Historic Environment 11(4):26–35.Google Scholar
  20. Wilde-Ramsing, M., 1994, Hidden beneath the waves: an underwater archaeology educational kit, Underwater Archaeology Unit, North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Kure Beach, North Carolina.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Underwater Heritage ProgramNew South Wales Heritage OfficeParramattaAustralia

Personalised recommendations