Pork Production and Human Health in the Major Pork Producing Countries

  • Tiffany T. Y. Guan
  • Richard A. Holley

Abstract

The present situation regarding pork production and its potential effect on human enteric illness in Denmark, the Netherlands, Taiwan, the United States, and Canada are discussed. Among these countries, the Netherlands has the highest hog density, followed by Taiwan, Denmark, North Carolina (U.S.), and Quebec (Canada). Denmark has the highest per capita pork consumption, followed by the Netherlands, Taiwan, Canada, and the U.S. In terms of human enteric illness, Denmark has the highest Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia cases per 100,000 population, while Canada has the highest Escherichia coli 0157:H7 cases. Foodborne illness data for Taiwan is not available for comparison. The prevalence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in pigs is highest in the U.S., while the prevalence of Yersinia is highest in Canadian swine. Pork-associated human illness in Denmark and the Netherlands seems to be affected by pork consumption level, pathogen prevalence in pigs, and hygiene at slaughter. Although pathogens are highly prevalent in Canadian and American swine, the cases of human enteric illness due to pork seem unrelated. It is believed that lower pork consumption and the tendency for thorough cooking of pork in these two countries may have influenced the low rate of pork-associated human illness. Despite an increase in pork production in the last decade, pork is not a major source of human enteric illness in Canada.

Keywords

Bacillus Turkey Manure Staphylococcus Clostridium 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiffany T. Y. Guan
    • 1
  • Richard A. Holley
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ManitobaWinnipeg

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