Middle Arabian Littoral

  • Peter N. Peregrine
Chapter

Abstract

The Arabian peninsula has been arid throughout the Holocene. However, in the middle Holocene a period of higher precipitation led to an expansion of grasslands and a consequent increase in both plant and animal populations. It was at this time that human groups began penetrating the Arabian peninsula and exploiting the ocean and coastal resources that figure prominently in the Early Arabian Littoral tradition. A return to a more contemporary climate took place during the Middle Arabian Littoral tradition. Grasslands were reduced, and settlement was largely restricted to a narrow coastal belt where good agricultural soils, a high water table, and ocean and coastal resources allowed sedentary communities to develop.

Keywords

Holocene Fishing Sorghum Burial Oman 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter N. Peregrine
    • 1
  1. 1.Deparment of AnthropologyLawrence UniversityAppletonUSA

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