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The Role of Skeletal Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis and Management of Mandibular Growth Abnormalities and Asymmetry

  • Zachary S. Peacock
  • Matthew E. Lawler
  • Frederic H. Fahey
  • Leonard B. Kaban
Chapter

Abstract

Mandibular growth abnormalities are challenging to diagnose and manage. Skeletal scintigraphy provides additional information regarding the area of abnormality and can classify the process as active or quiescent. This serves to guide the type and timing of operative treatment of the resultant deformity. Abnormalities in mandibular growth can result in significant facial deformity and asymmetry. Mandibular asymmetry may be congenital or acquired and often has functional, esthetic, and social consequences (Kaban, Acquired abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint. In: Kaban LB, Troulis MJ (eds) Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery, Elsevier, New York, pp 340–376, 2004; Gottlieb, J Oral Surg (Chic) 9:118–135, 1951; Obwegeser and Makek, J Maxillofac Surg 14:183–208, 1986). In general, asymmetry of the mandible may be classified as overgrowth or undergrowth conditions. Unilateral condylar hyperplasia is the most common overgrowth asymmetry. Overgrowth can also occur in response to trauma (e.g., condylar fracture in children), tumors in the condylar region, or fibrous dysplasia. Undergrowth of one side may be the result of trauma, radiation, inflammatory joint disease, idiopathic condylar resorption, or congenital malformation such as hemifacial microsomia.

Keywords

Fibrous Dysplasia Panoramic Radiograph Mandibular Condyle Orthognathic Surgery Mandibular Ramus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary S. Peacock
    • 1
    • 2
  • Matthew E. Lawler
    • 1
    • 2
  • Frederic H. Fahey
    • 3
    • 4
  • Leonard B. Kaban
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryHarvard School of Dental MedicineBostonUSA
  3. 3.Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine, Department of RadiologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  4. 4.Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of RadiologyBoston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA

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