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Local Drug Delivery to the Oral Cavity

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Part of the Advances in Delivery Science and Technology book series (ADST)

Abstract

The main pathogen in the oral cavity is of bacteriological origin; virus and fungal infection also account for oral malady as primary or secondary site. Thus, drug delivery to the oral cavity should be diversified, as the pathogens and pathogenicity have many faces and modes of action. In this chapter, various pathogens and numerous drug delivery systems are presented, and a growing trend in drug delivery to the oral cavity has been emphasized. Oral manifestations of systemic viral disease are common and represent an everlasting challenge to physicians. Fungal infections are also found in the oral cavity, usually as opportunistic infections secondary to a debilitating systemic condition. The harsh conditions of the oral environment are often a cause for micro- or macro-trauma to the soft and hard tissues of the oral cavity and present a challenge to drug treatment. If the drug is designated to act locally in the oral cavity and to remain in the site for a measured period of time, the dynamic conditions in the mouth such as changing pH levels, masticatory abrasion, slippery mucosa, and smooth teeth surfaces must all be taken into consideration for adhering a delivering tool. Polymers are one answer to the harsh demands of the oral cavity, as they can supply both a delivery tool and sustained-release apparatus, for example, use of polymeric microspheres; in general, microspheres have the potential to be used for targeted and controlled-release drug delivery. However, coupling of mucoadhesive properties to microspheres has additional advantages like more intimate contact with the mucus layer, efficient absorption, and enhanced bioavailability of the drugs due to a high surface-to-volume ratio.

Keywords

  • Oral Cavity
  • Periodontal Pocket
  • Pocket Depth
  • Chlorhexidine Gluconate
  • Local Drug Delivery

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 13.1
Fig. 13.2

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Qureshi, S., Khan, W., Perez-Davidi, M., Weiss, E.I., Beyth, N., Domb, A.J. (2014). Local Drug Delivery to the Oral Cavity. In: Domb, A., Khan, W. (eds) Focal Controlled Drug Delivery. Advances in Delivery Science and Technology. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9434-8_13

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