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Site-Specific Ocular Nucleic Acid Delivery

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Part of the Advances in Delivery Science and Technology book series (ADST)

Abstract

The eye is a very complex organ consisting of many anterior and posterior tissues. Studies over the last 2 decades have demonstrated the promise of using nucleic acids, such as DNA, siRNA, antisense oligonucleotide (AS-ODNs), and aptamer, in treating acquired as well as inherited ocular diseases. Among various ocular drug delivery strategies, topical administration is the most convenient route. However, the presence of several anatomical and physiological barriers restricts this administration only for anterior tissues. Stability, physicochemical properties, and propensity of spreading to adjacent tissues are limiting factors for site-specific delivery of nucleic acids in posterior tissues. To overcome these hurdles, several novel routes and delivery systems have been developed in recent years. These novel delivery systems possess several advantages including sustained and site-specific delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids. In this chapter, attempts have been made to introduce the structure of the eye, the major types of nucleic acids for the treatment of ocular diseases, and various strategies that have been used to achieve site-specific delivery of nucleic acids to the eye.

Keywords

  • Retinal Pigment Epithelium
  • Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell
  • Intravitreal Injection
  • Ocular Tissue
  • Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 11.1
Fig. 11.2

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Correspondence to Kun Cheng Ph.D. .

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Shukla, R.S., Cheng, K. (2014). Site-Specific Ocular Nucleic Acid Delivery. In: Domb, A., Khan, W. (eds) Focal Controlled Drug Delivery. Advances in Delivery Science and Technology. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9434-8_11

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