Strategic Health Communication

Chapter

Abstract

India is the world's second fastest growing economy but has over one-fourth of the total population living in slum conditions. Urban slum dwellers, women in particular, have limited access to basic health facilities as they are socially and economically marginalized. The lower quality of life among women in urban slums is often associated with a decline in their reproductive health. India has been implementing strategic health communication initiatives among women to step-up their knowledge and utilization of health services towards fulfilling the MDG of reducing maternal mortality and promoting reproductive health. This chapter discusses how strategic communication goes beyond information, communication and education (IEC) and behavior change communication (BCC) approaches to catalyze the reproductive health of urban slum women through an integrated approach of community mobilization, interpersonal communication, and capacity building of women. The chapter analyzes the benefits of successful strategic health communication initiatives for slum women in India and their implications for the health status of their sisters who live in urban slums of Asia and Africa.

Keywords

Urban slums India Behavior change communication Reproductive health care 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Communication and JournalismSri Padmavati Mahila UniversityTirupati 517 502India

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