A New Era for Energy and Meteorology

  • Beverley F. Ronalds
  • Alex Wonhas
  • Alberto Troccoli
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter it is argued that the successful transformation of the world’s energy systems depends on enhanced interplay between the meteorological and energy sciences. Key drivers of the energy transformation are described and the likely attributes and challenges of our future energy system are outlined. We identify a framework and give examples of ways in which a new cross-disciplinary science that truly combines energy and meteorological expertise will significantly reduce the risks and costs inherent in energy infrastructure. The need for this cross-disciplinary science is urgent given the scale and complexity of current and future energy infrastructure and its increasing vulnerability to the vagaries of the weather. Short-term opportunities to foster a much closer collaboration between energy and meteorology are also discussed.

Keywords

Biomass Fatigue Petroleum Uranium Shale 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beverley F. Ronalds
    • 1
  • Alex Wonhas
    • 1
  • Alberto Troccoli
    • 1
  1. 1.Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)HighettAustralia

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