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Aging, Hearing Loss, and Speech Recognition: Stop Shouting, I Can’t Understand You

Chapter
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 50)

Abstract

Age-related hearing loss is a multifactorial disorder that involves a variety of etiologies, anatomical alterations of the peripheral and central auditory system structures, and physiologic and behavioral consequences. This chapter provides a 20-year, broad historical perspective of major findings from animal and human research that has led to our current understanding of the nature of age-related hearing loss. Four principal domains are considered: (1) epidemiology,(2) models of presbycusis, (3) speech understanding performance, and (4) training to improve communication in real-world environments. Corresponding influences of supportive and distracting visual information, as well as age-related cognitive decline on auditory performance are also reviewed. The chapter culminates in a discussion of several emerging areas of research that should enable audiologists and hearing scientists to design creative technological and rehabilitative solutions to the most intractable auditory deficits reported by older people with hearing loss.

Keywords

Hearing Loss Speech Recognition Auditory Training Central Auditory Pathway Young Listener 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Hearing and Speech SciencesUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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