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The Importance of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator and Its Receptor for the Development and Progression of Atherosclerosis

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Role of Proteases in Cellular Dysfunction

Part of the book series: Advances in Biochemistry in Health and Disease ((ABHD,volume 8))

Abstract

Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a multifunctional multi-domain protein that is not only a regulator of fibrinolysis but it is also associated with several acute and chronic pathologic conditions. uPA mediates extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and plays a pivotal role in cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation during tissue remodeling. On the cell surface, uPA binds with high affinity to its receptor, the uPAR, providing a strictly localized proteolysis of ECM proteins. The uPA/uPAR complex also activates intracellular signaling, thus regulating cellular function. An imbalance in the uPA/uPAR system leads to disorders in tissue structure and function. This book chapter summarizes recent progress in understanding the role and mechanisms of the uPA/uPAR system in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis.

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Paland, N., Fuhrman, B. (2014). The Importance of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator and Its Receptor for the Development and Progression of Atherosclerosis. In: Dhalla, N., Chakraborti, S. (eds) Role of Proteases in Cellular Dysfunction. Advances in Biochemistry in Health and Disease, vol 8. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9099-9_14

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