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Social Metacognition, Micro-Creativity, and Justifications: Statistical Discourse Analysis of a Mathematics Classroom Conversation

Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series book series (CULS,volume 15)

Abstract

This analysis shows how statistical discourse analysis can identify the locations and consequences of pivotal moments and how characteristics of recent turns of talk such as questions and evaluations (social metacognition) are linked to characteristics of subsequent turns of talk, such as correct ideas, new ideas, or justifications. Along with the other studies in this unit, this analysis shows how multivocality can suggest cycles of analyses and help develop further statistical methods.

Keywords

  • Social Metacognition
  • Discussion Statistical Analysis
  • Pivotal Moment
  • Correct Idea
  • Previous Turn

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Chiu, M.M. (2013). Social Metacognition, Micro-Creativity, and Justifications: Statistical Discourse Analysis of a Mathematics Classroom Conversation. In: Suthers, D., Lund, K., Rosé, C., Teplovs, C., Law, N. (eds) Productive Multivocality in the Analysis of Group Interactions. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series, vol 15. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8960-3_7

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