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Focus-Based Constructive Interaction

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Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series book series (CULS,volume 15)

Abstract

If we can analyze the diversity of both the paths learners take and the goals that they reach in a collaborative situation, we will be able to utilize such diversity for further enriching learning. This chapter proposes the model of “focus-based constructive interaction,” which hypothesizes that the intramental interaction of each individual creates a personal focus affecting how he verbalizes and acts in collaborative moments and that the verbalization leads to his learning outcome. By applying this model to the origami fraction data, the chapter demonstrates that, even in a shared situation involving the six children, each child deepened his or her own understanding by asking his or her own questions and searching the external world for answers along his or her own focus, which remained relevant for several months. It also shows that the difference in foci produced different interpretations and promoted social interactions among them. The analytic devices of focus and role were discussed and contrasted with individual attribute for explaining individuals’ diverse progressions through social interaction.

Keywords

  • Conceptual Change
  • External Resource
  • Personal Focus
  • Individual Understanding
  • Constructive Interaction

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Hajime Shirouzu .

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Shirouzu, H. (2013). Focus-Based Constructive Interaction. In: Suthers, D., Lund, K., Rosé, C., Teplovs, C., Law, N. (eds) Productive Multivocality in the Analysis of Group Interactions. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series, vol 15. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8960-3_5

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