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A Multivocal Process Analysis of Social Positioning in Study Groups

Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series book series (CULS,volume 15)

Abstract

This chapter compares two multidimensional analyses of the PLTL Chemistry dataset, which each include a cognitive, relational, and motivational dimension. These multidimensional analyses serve to highlight the ways in which the complementary perspectives on collaborative processes offered by each dimension can be integrated in a way that offers deep insights into social positioning within collaborative groups. Differences revealed particularly along the relational and motivational dimensions raise important questions regarding the operationalization of interaction style as displayed through language and highlight the value of multivocality for the purpose of refining important constructs in ways that work towards theory building through integration of findings across research groups that employ different analytic frameworks coming from a common theoretical foundation.

Keywords

  • Relational Dimension
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Propositional Content
  • Cognitive Dimension
  • Mastery Goal

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 11.1

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by NSF grant SBE 0836012 to the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center.

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Correspondence to Iris Howley .

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Howley, I., Mayfield, E., Rosé, C.P., Strijbos, JW. (2013). A Multivocal Process Analysis of Social Positioning in Study Groups. In: Suthers, D., Lund, K., Rosé, C., Teplovs, C., Law, N. (eds) Productive Multivocality in the Analysis of Group Interactions. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series, vol 15. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8960-3_11

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