Community-Based Support and Unmet Needs Among Families of Persons with Brain Injuries: A Mixed Methods Study with the Brain Injury Association of America State Affiliates

Chapter
Part of the Risk and Resilience in Military and Veteran Families book series (RRMV)

Abstract

This study examined service gaps and post-injury needs for families of persons with brain injuries as perceived by leadership of 28 Brain Injury Association of America state affiliates. Participants report that BIAA affiliates assist families with a variety of information, service referral, and emotional support services. Participants stressed that, while many community-based programs and professionals are available, they do not adequately meet family caregiver needs. Similarly, participant responses to a modified version of the Family Needs Questionnaire indicate that families have a great need for post-injury rehabilitation supports but that these needs are seldom fully met. Finally, participants emphasized a need for enhanced training and knowledge regarding brain injury. Clinical service and research implications are discussed for the general public and for the families of veterans.

Keywords

Depression Radar Explosive Expense Mast 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Administration, Rehabilitation and Postsecondary EducationInterwork Institute, San Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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