Advertisement

Federal Programs in Climate Change and Health Research

  • Maya Levine
  • John Balbus
Chapter
Part of the Respiratory Medicine book series (RM, volume 7)

Abstract

The federal government plays an integral role in supporting climate change science and health research in the USA. Federally funded climate change research initially focused on science to understand climate and earth systems change during the 1970s and 1980s. Today, federally supported climate change research involves numerous agencies pursuing a wide range of climate change science topics and applications, including research exploring the connections between human health and climate change. Because each federal agency has a different mandate and range of scientific expertise, the focus and goals of various agencies’ climate change and human health research vary. For example, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) emphasizes the use of weather and climate forecasts and oceanographic data for public health applications, while the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) emphasizes health applications of remotely sensed data from its satellites. This chapter provides a brief history of federally funded climate research and includes a survey of the relevant agencies, programs, tools, and datasets to illustrate the diversity of health and climate change research supported by the federal government.

Keywords

Federal programs in climate change and health research Health research and climate change Climate change and federal programs Research in climate change Global Change Research Program 

References

  1. 1.
    Public Law 95–367: The National Climate Act. (15 U.S.C. 2901, 2908), 9/17/78). Library of Congress Thomas. http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d095:H.R.6669. Accessed 29 Aug 2012.
  2. 2.
    Pielke RA. The policy history of the US Global Change Research Program: Part I. Administrative development. Global environmental change, Vol 10. 2000. p. 12. http://foehn.colorado.edu/nome/HARC/Readings/Pielke2.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  3. 3.
    The United States Global Change Research Program. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=12782&page=493. Accessed May 2012.
  4. 4.
    GAO (General Accounting Office). Administration approach cautious pending validation of threat. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, NSIAD-90-63, Jan, US GPO, WA, DC. p. 16. http://www.gao.gov/assets/150/148577.pdf (1990).
  5. 5.
    Pielke RA. The policy history of the US Global Change Research Program: Part II. Legislative process. Global environmental change, Vol 10. 2000. p. 136. http://nome.colorado.edu/HARC/Readings/Pielke3.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  6. 6.
    Pielke RA. The development of the U.S. Global Change Research Program: 1987 to 1994. Prepared for American meteorological society policy symposium. 3–12 June 2001. Washington, DC. p. 8. http://www.ametsoc.org/atmospolicy/documents/AMSUSGCRPCase5-15-01bis.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  7. 7.
    Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and Committee on Global Change Research, National Research Council (NRC). Human dimensions of global environmental change: research pathways for the next decade. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 1999. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9641&page=R2. Accessed 29 Aug 2012.
  8. 8.
    National Research Council. Climate Change Science: An Analysis of Some Key Questions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2001. p. 24. http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=10139 Accessed 1 May 2012.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Our changing planet 2010. Washington, DC; 2010. p. 7. Our changing planet 2010. Accessed 1 May 2012.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. Science priorities for the human dimensions of global change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 1994. p. 3: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9175&page=3. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  11. 11.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Our changing planet 2010. Washington, DC; 2010. p. 4. Our changing planet 2010. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/ocp/ocp2010/ocp2010.pdf Accessed 1 May 2012.
  12. 12.
    The US Global Change Program Website. http://www.globalchange.gov/. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  13. 13.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). USGCRP strategic plan. Washington, DC; 2012. p. xiv. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/strategic-plan/2012/usgcrp-strategic-plan-2012.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  14. 14.
    ***The US Global Change Program Website Program History. http://globalchange.gov/about/program-structure/program-history. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  15. 15.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). USGCRP strategic plan. Washington, DC; 2012. p. 102. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/strategic-plan/2012/usgcrp-strategic-plan-2012.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  16. 16.
    Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. Science priorities for the Human dimensions of global change. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 1994. p. 496. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=12782&page=496. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  17. 17.
    The US Global Change Program Website. http://globalchange.gov/publications/our-changing-planet-ocp. Accessed 1 June 2012.
  18. 18.
    The US Global Change Program Website. What we do—interagency crosscutting group on climate and health. http://www.globalchange.gov/what-we-do/climate-change-health. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  19. 19.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Our changing planet 2010. Washington, DC; 2010. p. 38. Our changing planet 2010. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/ocp/ocp2010/ocp2010.pdf Accessed 1 May 2012.
  20. 20.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). USGCRP strategic plan. Washington, DC; 2012. p. 38, 40 & 69. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/strategic-plan/2012/usgcrp-strategic-plan-2012.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  21. 21.
    GCRP Newsletter. Paul Schramm, CDC/ONDIEH/NCEH.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
    Executive Order 13514. 52122 Federal Register, Vol. 74, No. 194, Thursday, 8 Oct 2009/Presidential documents. http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2009-10-08/pdf/E9-24518.pdf. Accessed 31 May 2012.
  24. 24.
    Program activity descriptions adapted from The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) 2012 strategic plan. The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). USGCRP strategic plan. Washington, DC; 2012. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/strategic-plan/2012/usgcrp-strategic-plan-2012.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  25. 25.
    The CDC’s Climate and Health Program, About our Program. http://www.cdc.gov/climatechange/about.htm. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  26. 26.
    The CDC’s Climate Ready States and Cities Program. http://www.cdc.gov/climatechange/climate_ready.htm. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  27. 27.
    The CDC. National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showHome.action. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  28. 28.
    The CDC Tracking Climate Change. http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showClimateChangeTracking.action. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  29. 29.
    The CDC. Climate Change Indicators Available on the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. http://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showClimateChangeIndicators.action. Accessed 1 June 2012.
  30. 30.
    Jessup CM, Balbus JM, Christian C, Haque E, Howe SE, Newton SA, Reid BC, Roberts L, Wilhelm E, Rosenthal JP. Climate change, human health, and biomedical research: analysis of the National Institutes of Health research portfolio. Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Apr;121(4):399-404, 404e1-7. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1104518. Epub 2013 Jan 17. PubMed PMID: 23552460; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3620768.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    NOAA Website. “Vital New Roadmap” Underscores Need to Study Climate Change, Human Health Links. http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2010/20100422_climatehealth.html. Accessed 29 Aug 2012.
  32. 32.
  33. 33.
    Ball E. NIH announces climate change and health funding. Environmental factor. NIEHS. 2010. http://niehs.nih.gov/news/newsletter/2010/september/spotlight-nih.cfm. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  34. 34.
    NIEHS Grantees Human Health Impacts of Climate Change. http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/programs/climate/grantees/Grantees. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  35. 35.
    The US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). USGCRP strategic plan. Washington, DC; 2012. p. 110. http://downloads.globalchange.gov/strategic-plan/2012/usgcrp-strategic-plan-2012.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  36. 36.
    NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration Website. http://www.ppi.noaa.gov/goals/. Accessed 29 Aug 2012.
  37. 37.
    NOAA Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI). http://oceansandhumanhealth.noaa.gov/about/. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  38. 38.
    NOAA’s Role Perspective on Climate Change and Health Presentation. http://iom.edu/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Environment/EnvironmentalHealthRT/RowlesHealthResearchAgendaForClimateChange.pdf. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  39. 39.
    Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for Environment and Public Health Impacts. NOS Agreement Code: MOA-2001-069/8371. Oct 2011.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    NIST Website. Environment and climate portal overview portal. http://www.nist.gov/environment-climate-portal.cfm. Accessed 29 Aug 2012.
  41. 41.
    NASA Global Climate Change Website. http://climate.nasa.gov/NasaRole/. Accessed 30 Aug 2012.
  42. 42.
    NASA Climate Change and Human Health Project. http://www.climatechangehumanhealth.org/aboutus/. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  43. 43.
    NASA Applied Science Program Website. http://appliedsciences.nasa.gov/health-air.html. Accessed 23 Sept 2012.
  44. 44.
    EPA Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program. http://www.epa.gov/air/benmap/. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  45. 45.
    Voorhees AS, et al. Climate change-related temperature impacts on warm season heat mortality: a proof-of-concept methodology using BenMAP. Environ Sci Technol. 2011;45(4):1450–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Fogarty International Center Ecology and Infectious Disease Program. http://www.fic.nih.gov/Programs/Pages/ecology-infectious-diseases.aspx. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  47. 47.
  48. 48.
  49. 49.
    Manga L, Bagayoko M, Meredith T, Neira M. Overview of health considerations within National Adaptation Programmes of Action for climate change in least developed countries and small island states. Geneva: World Health Organization, Department of Public Health and Environment. 2010. http://www.who.int/phe/Health_in_NAPAs_final.pdf. Accessed 27 Aug 2012.
  50. 50.
    NASA Earth Science Applied Sciences Division. 2011 annual report. p. 37. 2012. http://appliedsciences.nasa.gov/pdf/AppliedSciences2011AnnualReport.pdf. Accessed 27 Aug 2012.
  51. 51.
    NASA Earth Science Applied Sciences Division. 2011 annual report. p. 38. Aug 2012. http://appliedsciences.nasa.gov/pdf/AppliedSciences2011AnnualReport.pdf Accessed 27 Aug 2012.
  52. 52.
    USAID Climate Change Pillar: Adaptation. http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/environment/climate/policies_prog/adaptation.html. Accessed 1 May 2012.
  53. 53.
    NASA Earth Science Applied Sciences Division. 2011 annual report. p. 30. Aug 2012. http://appliedsciences.nasa.gov/pdf/AppliedSciences2011AnnualReport.pdf. Accessed 27 Aug 2012.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute of Environmental Health SciencesBethesdaUSA

Personalised recommendations