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Efficiency Definitions in the Field of PEC

  • Zhebo Chen
  • Todd G. Deutsch
  • Huyen N. Dinh
  • Kazunari Domen
  • Keith Emery
  • Arnold J. Forman
  • Nicolas Gaillard
  • Roxanne Garland
  • Clemens Heske
  • Thomas F. Jaramillo
  • Alan Kleiman-Shwarsctein
  • Eric Miller
  • Kazuhiro Takanabe
  • John Turner
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Energy book series (BRIEFSENERGY)

Abstract

Overall solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency is the most important parameter to characterize a PEC device. In fact, materials systems themselves are effectively defined by their highest-recorded STH efficiency; it is the single value by which all PEC devices can be reliably ranked against one another [1]. Unfortunately, published literature in the area of PEC sometimes contains confusing information regarding efficiency including invalid mathematical expressions for device efficiency, improper experimental methods for obtaining efficiency values, and/or wide-scale reporting of efficiencies other than STH without clear distinction. The first goal of this document is to establish proper definitions and mathematical expressions for device efficiencies. Among these definitions, we identify those that are acceptable for wide-scale benchmarking and reporting (for instance in the form of press releases to mainstream media) as well as those definitions which are helpful for their scientific value in material characterization and diagnostic testing (and suitable for journal publications). Later in this document, we overview the proper experimental procedures as well as common pitfalls that concern each type of efficiency measurement.

Keywords

Water Splitting External Quantum Efficiency Internal Quantum Efficiency Device Efficiency Interfacial Charge Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhebo Chen
    • 1
  • Todd G. Deutsch
    • 2
  • Huyen N. Dinh
    • 2
  • Kazunari Domen
    • 3
  • Keith Emery
    • 4
  • Arnold J. Forman
    • 5
  • Nicolas Gaillard
    • 6
  • Roxanne Garland
    • 7
  • Clemens Heske
    • 8
  • Thomas F. Jaramillo
    • 1
  • Alan Kleiman-Shwarsctein
    • 9
  • Eric Miller
    • 7
  • Kazuhiro Takanabe
    • 10
  • John Turner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Hydrogen Technologies and Systems CenterNational Renewable Energy LaboratoryGoldenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Chemical System EngineeringUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.National Center for PhotovoltaicsNational Renewable Energy LaboratoryGoldenUSA
  5. 5.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryUniversity of California—Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA
  6. 6.Hawaii Natural Energy InstituteUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA
  7. 7.Fuel Cell Technologies OfficeU.S. Department of EnergyWashington DCUSA
  8. 8.Department of ChemistryUniversity of Nevada—Las VegasLas VegasUSA
  9. 9.Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of California—Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA
  10. 10.Division of Physical Sciences and EngineeringKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)ThuwallSaudi Arabia

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