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Quality of Life in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

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Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Ovarian Cancer

Abstract

Research examining outcomes in ovarian cancer has evolved from concentrating on more traditional clinical end points to also emphasizing quality of life (QOL). Both disease- and treatment-related factors may result in QOL decrements. Thus, QOL represents an important consideration in ovarian cancer treatment decision-making. This chapter reviews the physical, psychological, and sexual concerns that may influence QOL, as well as advances in the measurement of patient-reported QOL in ovarian cancer. The chapter discusses QOL in the context of recent treatment advances and highlights the need for future randomized controlled trials to assess the effects of intervention trials on QOL.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Unless otherwise specified, the term “ovarian cancer” is used to refer to epithelial ovarian cancer throughout this chapter.

  2. 2.

    We use this term to refer to quality of life in the context of ovarian cancer and its treatment, what many have termed “health-related quality of life.”

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Jensen, S.E., Cella, D. (2014). Quality of Life in Patients with Ovarian Cancer. In: Farghaly, S. (eds) Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Ovarian Cancer. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8271-0_14

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