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Overview of Issues Related to Serving Asian and Asian American Clients

  • J. Mark Davis
Chapter
Part of the Issues of Diversity in Clinical Neuropsychology book series (ISSUESDIV)

Abstract

The Asian population in the USA is expected to increase by 79 % between 2000 and 2050, and the Asian population grew faster than any other racial group, expanding from around 10 million to approximately 15 million, between 2000 and 2010. At the same time, estimates suggest that minorities comprise only 7.2 % of the American Psychological Association (APA) membership and 6.8 % of the Division 40 membership. Only 1.7 % of individuals certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology have Asian surnames, admittedly a crude estimate of the number of neuropsychologists of Asian heritage. The National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) directory lists fewer than 20 clinical neuropsychologists who report proficiency in Asian languages. With nearly 15 million people in the USA self-identifying as “Asian,” it is unlikely that an Asian American who presents for neuropsychological assessment will be served by a neuropsychologist from their racial, ethnic, and/or linguistic background. Clinical neuropsychologists who are not from Asian backgrounds need to learn about factors that likely influence assessment and treatment with Asian American clients. This chapter provides an overview of demographic characteristics of major Asian groups (except those from the Indian subcontinent) and sets the stage for more in-depth discussion of cultural, linguistic, ethical, cognitive, and psychometric factors later in the book. Clinical neuropsychologists who lack knowledge of cultural variables and appropriate procedures and norms specific to Asians or Asian Americans are at risk for failing to engage clients and for making assumptions and conclusions based on faulty, inadequate, or inappropriate information.

Keywords

American Psychological Association English Proficiency American Community Survey Asian Group Refugee Camp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Psychological and Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Health, Science & EnvironmentCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia

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