Artificial Cognitive System Architectures

  • James A. Crowder
  • John N. Carbone
  • Shelli A. Friess
Chapter

Abstract

Our proposed ACNF, discussed earlier in the book, provides an outline for a possibilistic architecture that can facilitate cognition, learning, memories, and information processing, but it is not solely sufficient to create a comprehensive, autonomous SELF. An overall SELF architecture framework, along with both a knowledge and cognitive framework are required in order to facilitate our fully autonomous, cognitive, self-aware, self-assessing, SELF. We have discussed a SELF system for cognitive management, PENLPE, now we will look at an overall cognitive processing framework, called the Intelligent information Software Agents to facilitate Artificial Consciousness (ISAAC). A SELF architecture, allows dynamic adaptation of the structural elements of the cognitive system, providing abilities to add and prune cognitive elements as necessary as part of SELF evolution [54]. The overall architecture also accommodates a variety of memory classes and algorithmic methods. The basic building blocks of ISAAC comprise an ACNF framework, Cognitron architecture, Fuzzy, Self-Organizing, Semantic Topical Maps (FUSE-SEMs), and a comprehensive Abductive Neural Processing system, the Possibilistic Abductive Neural Network (PANN), for providing consciousness and SELF cognitive functions. Within an ISAAC framework, Cognitrons are added or deleted from the system, based upon the complexity of the classes of information processed. This chapter expounds upon background and architecture for ISAAC, as well as, human-SELF interaction and collaboration, Cognitive, Interactive Training Environment (CITE).

Keywords

Assimilation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • James A. Crowder
    • 1
  • John N. Carbone
    • 2
  • Shelli A. Friess
    • 3
  1. 1.EnglewoodUSA
  2. 2.Raytheon Intelligence and Information SystemsMcKinneyUSA
  3. 3.Relevant Counseling LLCEnglewoodUSA

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