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Mycosis Fungoides

  • Roberto N. Miranda
  • Joseph D. Khoury
  • L. Jeffrey Medeiros
Chapter
Part of the Atlas of Anatomic Pathology book series (AAP)

Abstract

Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a T-cell lymphoma that clinically is characterized by chronic progression of skin lesions and pathologically is composed of cerebriform lymphocytes that tend to infiltrate the epidermis (epidermotropism). MF is the most common type of T-cell lymphoma involving the skin and accounts for more than 50 % of all cases of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Many authors use the term CTCL as a synonym for MF, but here we use the term CTCL more broadly. Patients with MF are mostly adults, and often elderly. The male to female ratio is 2:1. MF arises in and primarily involves skin, and commonly affects multiple areas. Involvement of blood at low levels is common. Extracutaneous dissemination may occur in advanced stages, mainly to lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and lungs. Bone marrow involvement at a low level can occur but morphologically obvious bone marrow involvement is rare.

Keywords

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Mycosis Fungoides Bone Marrow Involvement Cutaneous Lymphocyte Antigen Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto N. Miranda
    • 1
  • Joseph D. Khoury
    • 1
  • L. Jeffrey Medeiros
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HematopathologyThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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