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Burkitt Lymphoma

  • Roberto N. Miranda
  • Joseph D. Khoury
  • L. Jeffrey Medeiros
Chapter
Part of the Atlas of Anatomic Pathology book series (AAP)

Abstract

Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that usually involves extranodal sites, and is highly associated with translocations involving the MYC gene at chromosome 8q24 in partnership with immunoglobulin genes.

Clinically and epidemiologically, BL cases can be divided into three groups: endemic, sporadic, and immunodeficiency-associated. Endemic BL occurs within 15° latitude north or south of equatorial Africa. Other endemic areas include Papua New Guinea and Northern Brazil. Evidence of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection is present in more than 95 % of patients. There is also a link with malaria and arbovirus infection. The median age of patients with endemic BL ranges from 4 to 7 years, with a boy/girl ratio of 2 to 1. The jaw is the most well-known site of disease, involving either the maxilla or mandible in 50–60 % of patients, but large abdominal masses involving retroperitoneal structures, the gastrointestinal tract, or the gonads are also concomitantly present.

Keywords

Burkitt Lymphoma Extranodal Site Arbovirus Infection Large Abdominal Mass Burkitt Lymphoma Case 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto N. Miranda
    • 1
  • Joseph D. Khoury
    • 1
  • L. Jeffrey Medeiros
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HematopathologyThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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