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Parasomnias pp 201–206Cite as

Recurrent Isolated Sleep Paralysis (RISP)

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Abstract

Sleep paralysis episodes are characterized by a transient inability to move the head, trunk, and all extremities at sleep onset (hypnagogic) and/or upon awakening (hypnopompic). These sleep paralysis episodes are REM-sleep phenomena, occur intermittently and mostly identified as isolated cases; but when they occur more frequently over a person’s lifetime, they are referred to as recurrent isolated sleep paralysis (RISP). Familial forms of sleep paralysis have also been reported, and in patients diagnosed with narcolepsy. In this chapter, we will discuss RISP in its myriad of clinical presentations and also discuss potential management options available.

Keywords

  • Sleep paralysis
  • Isolated
  • Recurrent
  • Familial
  • Antidepressants
  • Cultural characteristics

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Correspondence to Sricharan Moturi M.D., M.P.H. .

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Moturi, S., Matta, P. (2013). Recurrent Isolated Sleep Paralysis (RISP). In: Kothare, S., Ivanenko, A. (eds) Parasomnias. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7627-6_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7627-6_13

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