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Promoting Social Competence and Reducing Behavior Problems in At-Risk Students: Implementation and Efficacy of Universal and Selective Prevention Programs in Schools

  • Brian P. Daly
  • Elizabeth Nicholls
  • Richa Aggarwal
  • Mark Sander
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

This chapter provides a review of school-based universal and selective prevention programs that have been employed with at-risk children and seek to promote social competence while also reducing behavior problems. The review focuses on programs used with elementary and middle school students and includes details of target goals, programmatic activities, implementation, and effectiveness. Included in this chapter are programs that have received empirical support for at-risk students and can be delivered by school mental health personnel or teachers in the school setting. The discussion examines key challenges, important next steps for program implementation, and key future research directions.

Keywords

Prosocial Behavior Social Competence Elementary School Student School Mental Health Good Behavior Game 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian P. Daly
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Nicholls
    • 1
  • Richa Aggarwal
    • 1
  • Mark Sander
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Hennepin County, Human Services and Public Health DepartmentMinneapolis Public SchoolsMinneapolisUSA

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