Introduction

  • Anna J. Osterholtz
  • Kathryn M. Baustian
  • Debra L. Martin
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter sets forth a framework in which commingled and fragmentary assemblages can be theorized, categorized, and analyzed. Basic terminology that is used throughout the subsequent chapters is also provided. The focus on commingled, disarticulated, disturbed, and/or collective burials is explored in terms of the innovation and applicability of the case studies that constitute the subsequent chapters of the volume. Provided here is a general overview of the chapters comprising the rest of the volume, as well as an analytical framework in which commingled and fragmentary assemblages can begin to be examined in bioarchaeological contexts.

Keywords

Burning Turkey Excavation Burial Toll 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna J. Osterholtz
    • 1
  • Kathryn M. Baustian
    • 1
  • Debra L. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Nevada, Las VegasLas VegasUSA

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