Secretin, Politics, and the New Institute

  • John Henderson
Part of the People and Ideas Series book series (PEOPL)

Abstract

When Starling moved to his new department at University College in 1899, it occupied the top floor in the north wing, above the Slade School of Fine Art. (The north wing is on the left side of the quadrangle as one enters from Gower Street.) From its beginnings in 1871, the Slade had been one of the college’s most successful departments; within four years it was full to capacity, with 220 students, including many of the college’s first women (Harte and North, 1991). In the basement of the north wing was the chemistry department, forming the bottom layer of an interesting academic sandwich.

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References

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© American Physiological Society 2005

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  • John Henderson

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