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Processes in the Development of Individual and Collective Consciousness and the Role of Religious and Spiritual Communities

  • Elena Mustakova-Possardt
  • Michael Basseches
Chapter
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology book series (ICUP)

Abstract

This closing chapter explores a framework that recognizes the role of dialectical thinking, “a movement of the head”, and motivational community processes “a movement of the heart”, as an essential dynamic for the collective movement forward. It explores the potential for purposeful dialogical engagement between social scientists and diverse spiritual and philosophical communities toward global integrative solutions.

Keywords

Unity in diversity Global ethic Religion Dialectical integration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Health Realization Psychotherapy and ConsultingArlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologySuffolk UniversityLexingtonUSA

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