Motivational Interviewing in Psychosomatic Medicine

Chapter

Abstract

Motivational interviewing (MI) was developed by Miller in 1983 initially as a brief intervention for problem drinking to elicit motivation for change [1]. Since then, MI has been widely used in the treatment of various types of psychological problems and behavior problems. Psychological problems include anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorder, substance abuse and dependence, and pathological gambling, and behavior problems include medication adherence and health-related behaviors such as diet, smoking, exercise, and sexual behavior [2, 3]. MI also has been found to be effective in health-care settings such as dentistry, emergency department, mental health department, and rehabilitation center. A topical bibliography of research is found [4]; MI has been applied to a variety of physical diseases including asthma, head injury, cardiovascular disease (e.g., hypertension), diabetes, obesity, HIV/AIDS, and pain disorder. In addition, domestic violence, family relationships, and offenders are candidates for MI.

Keywords

Obesity Arthritis Depression 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Christian Studies DivisionBaekseok UniversityCheonanKorea

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