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Model After-School Programs

  • David J. Shernoff
Chapter
  • 4.2k Downloads
Part of the Advancing Responsible Adolescent Development book series (ARAD)

Abstract

In this chapter, four engaging after-school programs are examined: (a) PeaceJam (community service and social action program), (b) The Young Women Leaders Program, (c) The Center for Family Life’s Lifelines Community Art Project, and (d) Project Explore (Science exploration program). For each, a description of the program is presented, followed by observations made upon visiting the program and summary of research finding demonstrating a high level of youth engagement among participants. The after-school models presented in this chapter illustrate that self-directed learners are motivated by flow, discovery, choice, and other intrinsic rewards. This type of learning thrives on active exploration followed by structured reflection. Intentional strategies to infuse and enrich opportunities for engagement and learning with academic content can help us to move beyond “more of the same” traditional academic models for both academic and nonacademic programming in schools. As with the programs discussed in this chapter, art programs in which students work alongside adult artists or science programs in which youth participate in archeological digs alongside scientists can provide powerful, rich, and real-world ways of meeting learning goals, especially when learning about cultural heritage along the way. Such activities were experienced much more positively than the traditional curricula, offering students the experience of challenge, deep concentration, and heightened motivation characteristic of flow experiences.

Keywords

Middle School Civic Engagement Positive Youth Development Seventh Grade Service Project 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Shernoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations College of EducationNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA

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