Self-Acceptance and Christian Theology

  • Stevan Lars Nielsen
  • Aurora Szentagotai
  • Oana A. Gavita
  • Viorel Lupu
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we explore self-acceptance in Christianity and rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Our thesis is that the self and self-acceptance as evident in fundamental tenets of Christianity and as conceptualized in REBT overlap or parallel one another sufficiently that they resonate. We will show that this resonance allows use of Christian scripture in therapy to help people attain greater self-acceptance. We chose REBT’s approach to self-acceptance because REBT theory is specific about the nature of the self and self-acceptance, because REBT theory is clear about the function of self-acceptance in emotion and behavior, and because REBT offers a well-defined method for helping clients deal with emotional problems that arise because of conditional self-acceptance (CSA). Helping clients attain unconditional self-acceptance (USA) is one of REBT’s fundamental goals.

Keywords

Dust Europe Ghost Nigeria Lost 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stevan Lars Nielsen
    • 1
  • Aurora Szentagotai
    • 2
  • Oana A. Gavita
    • 2
  • Viorel Lupu
    • 3
  1. 1.Counseling and Psychological ServicesBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Psychology and PsychotherapyBabeş-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania
  3. 3.Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and PharmacyCluj-NapocaRomania

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