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Humanistic Psychology and Self-Acceptance

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The Strength of Self-Acceptance

Abstract

Humanistic psychology, it could be maintained, was the first psychological theory that gave serious consideration to the value and implications of self-acceptance in psychology, at least in its more explicit and positive constructions. As will be discussed, humanistic psychology began by advocating for radical self-acceptance that embraced a view of oneself, and human nature, as essentially good. Over time, the understanding of self-acceptance became more nuanced, particularly with the introduction of existential psychology as a school of thought within the humanistic tradition. In this chapter, we provide an overview of important humanistic views on self-acceptance, emphasizing how these emerge from a particular understanding of human nature as well as the implications for psychotherapy.

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Correspondence to Louis Hoffman .

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Hoffman, L., Lopez, A.J., Moats, M. (2013). Humanistic Psychology and Self-Acceptance. In: Bernard, M. (eds) The Strength of Self-Acceptance. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6806-6_1

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