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Party Governance and Party Democracy

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces the concepts of party democracy and party government. First, it outlines which roles have been ascribed to political parties in the extant literature, focusing on the externally directed behavior of parties in the main areas where political competition plays out. It then highlights the contributions of the individual chapters of this volume that address how political parties perform within the existing institutional frameworks, and describes how they each contribute to an analytical and empirical understanding of party democracy and party government in today’s democracies. Last, it presents the central advances in research on party government in the contributions of Kaare Strøm.

Keywords

Party democracy Party functions Party governance Party government Party research 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.University of OsloOsloNorway

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