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Involving Family in the Prevention and Intervention of Behavior Problems in Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are more likely than typically developing individuals to develop severe behavioral or mental health problems, placing significant stress and burden on caregivers. Collaborating with family in intervention efforts may provide effective supports for the individual with IDD and have positive collateral effects on family members who may be suffering significant psychological distress. In this chapter we draw on a prevention framework and discuss integrating family in the prevention and intervention of behavior problems in individuals with IDD. We use a three-tiered model to discuss various levels of prevention and the integration of family at universal, selected, and indicated prevention across the domains of social support, stress management, assessment, and parent education and family behavioral supports.

Keywords

Behavior Problem Parenting Stress Parent Training Dual Diagnosis Behavioral Parent Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Preparation of this chapter was supported in part by grant R01HD059838 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development awarded to the first author.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences5208 University of OregonEugeneUSA

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