Assessment of Anxiety Symptoms Using the MMPI-2, MMPI-2-RF, and MMPI-A

Chapter

Abstract

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory is one of the most well validated and extensively researched psychological instruments. In recent years there have been modified versions for adolescents and a restructured form with improved validation of the original eight clinical scales.“In this chapter, guidelines for optimally using this collection of measures for anxiety disorder treatment planning are provided. Special consideration is given to the use of MMPI scales within empirically supported frameworks of anxiety symptoms.”

Keywords

Fatigue Depression Manifold Schizophrenia Clarification 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyKent State UniversityKentUSA

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