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Designing Multistage Samples

  • Richard Valliant
  • Jill A. Dever
  • Frauke Kreuter
Chapter
Part of the Statistics for Social and Behavioral Sciences book series (SSBS, volume 51)

Abstract

Previous chapters have covered the design of samples selected in a single stage. However, sampling is often done using more than one stage. There are a number of reasons why cluster or multistage sampling may be used. Using multistage samples can often be a practical and cost-efficient solution in situations where a list of elementary (or analytic) units is not available for direct sampling. In those cases, a list of elementary units can be compiled within just the sample clusters rather than for the whole frame. This is especially useful in household samples if a list of every household in a country, state, county, etc., is not available. In other cases, permission to do a survey may have to be obtained at the cluster level. For example, if the goal is to administer a standardized test to a sample of students, administrators in the school district or in the school may have to grant permission to do the survey.

Keywords

Variance Component Block Group Simple Random Sampling Primary Sampling Unit Sample Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Valliant
    • 1
  • Jill A. Dever
    • 2
  • Frauke Kreuter
    • 3
  1. 1.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.RTI InternationalWashington, DCUSA
  3. 3.University of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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