Flavor

  • John M. deMan
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Flavor has been defined by Hall (1968) as follows: “Flavor is the sensation produced by a material taken in the mouth, perceived principally by the senses of taste and smell, and also by the general pain, tactile and temperature receptors in the mouth. Flavor also denotes the sum of the characteristics of the material which produce that sensation.”

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. deMan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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