Carbohydrates

  • John M. deMan
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Carbohydrates occur in plant and animal tissues as well as in microorganisms in many different forms and levels. In animal organisms, the main sugar is glucose and the storage carbohydrate is glycogen; in milk, the main sugar is almost exclusively the disac- charide lactose. In plant organisms, a wide variety of monosaccharides and oligosaccharides occur, and the storage carbohydrate is starch. The structural polysaccharide of plants is cellulose. The gums are a varied group of polysaccharides obtained from plants, seaweeds, and microorganisms. Because of their useful physical properties, the gums have found widespread application in food processing. The carbohydrates that occur in a number of food products are listed in Table 4-1.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. deMan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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