Additives and Contaminants

  • John M. deMan
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

The possibility of harmful or toxic sub-stances becoming part of the food supply concerns the public, the food industry, and regulatory agencies. Toxic chemicals may be introduced into foods unintentionally through direct contamination, through environmental pollution, and as a result of processing. Many naturally occurring food compounds may be toxic. A summary of the various toxic chemicals in foods (Exhibit 11-1) was presented in a scientific status summary of the Institute of Food Technologists (1975). Many toxic substances present below certain levels pose no hazard to health. Some substances are toxic and at the same time essential for good health (such as vitamin A and selenium). An understanding of the properties of additives and contaminants and how these materials are regulated by governmental agencies is important to the food scientist. Regulatory controls are dealt with in Chapter 12.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. deMan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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