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Colonial Encounters of the Nordic Kind

  • James Symonds
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA, volume 37)

Abstract

This end chapter reviews the contributions to the volume. The historical archaeology of Danish and Swedish colonialism is examined in relation to wider debates about the archaeology of colonialism and recent trends in postcolonial studies.

Keywords

Indigenous People Historical Archaeology Trade Good European Colonialism Colonial Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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