Sweden in the Delaware Valley: Everyday Life and Material Culture in New Sweden

  • Fredrik Ekengren
  • Magdalena Naum
  • Ulla Isabel Zagal-Mach Wolfe
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA, volume 37)

Abstract

In 1637 the Swedish Crown, encouraged by Dutch merchants, developed a plan to establish a colonial outpost in America to tap into profitable tobacco and beaver pelt trade. The same year the first cargo ships left Sweden and sailed westwards to claim their piece of America along the Delaware River. Although in many ways unsuccessful and short-lived (the colony collapsed in 1656), New Sweden became a home for generations of colonists. This chapter focuses on the different aspects of their daily life: their longing and desperation, practices of homemaking and domesticating the landscape and their perception and interactions with the neighbouring Native American groups. It discusses the ways material culture was used, exchanged and appropriated by the colonists and the local Lenape and Susquehannock in the processes of meeting, negotiations and daily coexistence.

Keywords

Clay Migration Corn Europe Shipping 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This chapter summarises some of the results of an ongoing research project on the colony of New Sweden. We thank the Crafoord Foundation, Riksbankens Jubileumsfond and the Department of Archaeology, Lund University for the financial support of the project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fredrik Ekengren
    • 1
  • Magdalena Naum
    • 1
  • Ulla Isabel Zagal-Mach Wolfe
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Archaeology and Ancient HistoryLund UniversityLundSweden
  2. 2.Sydsvensk Arkeologi ABMalmöSweden

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