The Educational Therapist and Mathematics

Chapter

Abstract

How indeed? This quotation, from a tenth grader named Ryan, asks the questions many students with NVLD ask: “Why is mathematics so hard? How am I going to pass my math classes?” Students with NVLD often find, as Ryan did, that mathematics is a very difficult subject for them.

Keywords

Stein Rote 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Annie Wright SchoolsTacomaUSA

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